Author Archives: cantorcolmanreaboi

Colleyville:  Trying to Find Answers

Join Cantor Reaboi for an open discussion about the hostage situation last weekend at a Reform Synagogue in Colleyville, TX.  Let’s seek answers, look to the future, and find solace in each other’s company.

Saturday, January 22nd at 7pm on Zoom

Zoom Login: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88675928440?pwd=UkRVTEtmTDJHVzY4Yk8vZ3Z2bUpidz09

Meeting ID: 886 7592 8440

Religious School To Be Virtual This Week 1/13 & 1/16

Dear Parents,

The Religious Practices Committee met to talk about Religious School and the current COVID surge.  It was decided that next week, we will hold classes virtually.  Those days would be Thursday the 13th, and Sunday the 16th for the Family Tu Bishvat Experience.  After next week, the Committee will reevaluate the situation and decide about in-person vs. virtual classes.  The Committee will reevaluate and make decisions on a weekly basis.

Please know that the CAA Religious School cares for the health of our teachers and our students.  The teachers will contact you and plan accordingly for next week.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact either myself or the Religious School Committee Chair Stacey Gay.

Shabbat Shalom,

Cantor Colman Reaboi

Shabbat Rishona this Shabbat!

The first Shabbat of every month is Shabbat Rishona, a family-friendly Shabbat experience.

•Saturday, January 8, 2022 at 9:30 am, Congregation Agudath Achim
•Out of an abundance of caution, Shabbat Rishona will be on Zoom!
Please join us for a Family Friendly service, followed by a fun game of
“Jewpardy”.
•As a reminder, this is in place of Religious School on Sunday,
January 9th, so there is no school on Sunday.

Adult Study Opportunities for January

NEW! Evening Adult Study- Book Discussion:

In an age of fluid identity, many people are honestly asking the question “Why be Jewish?” What in this religious and ethnic legacy is worth preserving? Does Judaism have something unique to offer a contemporary seeker free to choose a way of life and a system of values?

Tuesdays 6:30pm-7:30pm on Zoom /Dates:  January 11th, 18th February 8th (Purchase book on Amazon)

Please RSVP: office@tauntonshul.com or (508) 822-3230

Sunday Speaker Series- Sundays 9:30am-11:30am

January 23rd– Gordon Amgott: “States Rights Vs. Federal Rights over the course of our Country’s History”

Please RSVP: office@tauntonshul.com or (508) 822-3230

MOVIES AND MORE CLUB

The Movies and More Club meets monthly to discuss* the meanings of a variety of Jewish-themed movies and television series. We’ll also learn about notable Jewish actors, directors, and screenwriters.

Tuesday, January 25th 6:30-7:30

January Movie: “The Pianist”, directed by Roman Polanski and starring Adrian Brody

Please RSVP to office@tauntonshul.com or (508) 822-3230

*Please watch the movie before you come to the discussion.

Adding Meaning to the Lights- The 6th Candle

Happy Hanukkah!

Judaism teaches us that what we do with our lives is precious.  Adding meaning to all of our actions is a holy act- whether we are praying, eating, washing our hands, or partaking in normal, everyday activities, doing them with intention lifts the seemingly mundane to the level of holiness. Simply put, Judaism asks of us to act not mindlessly but with intention. Hanukkah, or  חנוכה ​means ‘Dedication’. As we light the Hanukkah candles, let our intent be meaningful with each night. 
We dedicate the 6th Candle to those who struggle with mental illness.  With nearly 20% of our country diagnosed with some form of mental illness, there are nearly 5% who struggle with severe mental illness.  In other words, nearly 50 million Americans struggle, and their families struggle as well.  Mental illness also contributes to drug addiction and suicide.
Tonight, let us offer a Mishebeirach prayer on behalf of those who suffer and struggle with mental illness:
May the One who blessed our ancestors — Who named us Israel (Yisrael), those who “struggle,” Bless and heal those among us who struggle with mental well-being. May they acknowledge their own strength and resilience in persevering, May they treat themselves with forgiveness and patience, May they find others who share their experiences, so they know they are not alone, May they find help, compassion and resources when they are able to reach out for them, May they find others willing to reach out first when they cannot, And may they find inclusive and welcoming communities that will uplift and celebrate them. May the Holy One grant us the strength and resilience to support our loved ones, May we find the patience and forgiveness we need for ourselves and others, May we find solidarity and support from other caregivers, May we find the capacity to listen without judgment and with the intention to help when asked, May we find the ability to notice when others are struggling and reach out to them first, And may we create communities that accept, uplift and celebrate those among us who are struggling.
AMEN.

Adding Meaning to the Lights: The 5th Candle

Happy Hanukkah!

Judaism teaches us that what we do with our lives is precious.  Adding meaning to all of our actions is a holy act- whether we are praying, eating, washing our hands, or partaking in normal, everyday activities, doing them with intention lifts the seemingly mundane to the level of holiness. Simply put, Judaism asks of us to act not mindlessly but with intention. Hanukkah, or  חנוכה ​means ‘Dedication’. As we light the Hanukkah candles, let our intent be meaningful with each night. 

Let us dedicate the 5th Candle to Acts of Compassion (Rachamim).  Rachamim also shares the same route verb as womb, or brotherhood.  Maimonides declared that “arrogant, cruel, misanthropic, and unloving persons were to be suspected of not being true Jews” (Yad, Issurei Bi’ah, 19:17). The Torah teaches us that G-d’s compassion is a reflection of our ability to show compassion to others. The prophet Isaiah wrote, “Learn to do well; seek justice; relieve the oppressed; judge the fatherless; plead for the widow.”

May this 5th Candle of Hanukkah serve as a light of compassion for others.  Below is a prayer by Trisha Arlin:

Barukh Atah Adonai
Blessed One-ness, Blessed Connection,
Kadosh Barukh Hu:
We pray for all who are in pain
And all who cause pain.

We pray for those of us 
Who are so angry
That we have lost compassion for the suffering
Of anyone who is not a member of our group.
And we pray for those of us
Who cannot see the suffering
behind the loss of that compassion.

We pray for the strength
To resist the urge to inhumanity
That we feel in times of fear and mourning.
We pray for the courage
To resist the calls to inhumanity
That others may make upon us in times of crisis.

Barukh Atah Adonai
Blessed One-ness, Blessed Connection,
Kadosh Barukh Hu:
May we find relief from our hurts and fears.
And may we not, in our pain,
Lose our empathy
For the hurts and fears of others.
We pray for all who are in pain
And all who cause pain.

Amen

Adding Meaning to the lights- The 4th Candle

Let us dedicate the 4th Candle to upholding Human Rights:

In the Hanukkah story, the Maccabees fought for liberty, for the right to practice their religion, for the dignity of human freedom. Who are the Maccabees who stand for human rights in our world today?

Nelson Mandela is a Maccabee for helping South Africa emerge from a history of apartheid. He ensured that his society would be ruled by forgiveness and reconciliation, not by vengeance over the past.

The Dalai Lama is a Maccabee for representing peaceful resistance to the Chinese occupation of his native Tibet and has become a peace emissary to the world.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a Maccabee by helping this country face its racism and showed us a path to a better America.

Hanukkah: 3rd Night Dedication

Dear Members,

Happy Hanukkah!

Judaism teaches us that what we do with our lives is precious.  Adding meaning to all of our actions is a holy act- whether we are praying, eating, washing our hands, or partaking in normal, everyday activities, doing them with intention lifts the seemingly mundane to the level of holiness. Simply put, Judaism asks of us to act not mindlessly but with intention.

Hanukkah, or  חנוכה ​means ‘Dedication’. As we light the Hanukkah candles, let our intent be meaningful with each night. Let us dedicate the 3rd Candle to stopping Domestic Violence and Abuse:

“May the lights of our Hanukkah Menorah shed light on those that cower in the darkness. May their fear be quelled by Your Eternal Love. Guardian of Israel who never slumbers or sleeps, protect the victims of violence and bullying. May You protect those who suffer because of words that hurt more than fists. May we do all we can to offer comfort and help to those who are too weak or who live in fear. May we lift up those in need and remove the stumbling blocks that stand in their way. May the 3rd candle inspire us to act, as the Torah commands: “Love your neighbor”, and “Do not place a stumbling block before the blind”. (Leviticus)

Do you want to help protect victims of domestic violence and abuse?

https://www.jfcsboston.org/Our-Services/Center-for-Basic-Needs-Assistance/Journey-to-Safety-Response-to-Domestic-Abuse/Jewish-Domestic-Violence-Coalition

Hanukkah 2nd Night Candle Dedication

Happy Hanukkah!

Judaism teaches us that what we do with our lives is precious.  Adding meaning to all of our actions is a holy act- whether we are praying, eating, washing our hands, or partaking in normal, everyday activities, doing them with intention lifts the seemingly mundane to the level of holiness. Simply put, Judaism asks of us to act not mindlessly but with intention.

Hanukkah, or  חנוכה means ‘Dedication’. As we light the Hanukkah candles, let our intent be meaningful with each night. The 1st candle is dedicated to family and friends.  Let us dedicate the 2nd candle of Hanukkah to doing our share to stop world hunger:

“As we light the 2nd candle of Hanukkah, let us do so with the promise to work toward a future where we can share in our bounties.  While we are blessed to be able to eat latkes, jelly donuts and anything we want this time of year, we are aware of those who will go to bed hungry tonight.  This 2nd candle is lit with the intent that we will do what we can to feed the poor and hungry in our community and the greater world community.  Then will the prophet’s words ring true:  “You shall eat in plenty and be satisfied (Joel, 2:26).”

Want to do more about the Jewish response to hunger and what YOU can do?

MAZON – A Jewish Response to Hunger MAZON spotlights issues and populations where larger organizations and the government have yet to turn their focus. Your support for MAZON’s Spotlight Fund furthers this work, by allowing us to fight to end hunger among military families, veterans, Native Americans, single mothers, LGBTQ seniors, the people of Puerto Rico and the territories, and all who struggle.

Cantor Colman Reaboi

Spiritual Leader, Congregation Agudath Achim

It’s Menorah Madness!

A Hanukkah Celebration, Featuring “The Aleph Beats”

Bring your Chanukah Menorahs to Services and fill the Sanctuary with the lights of Hanukkah!!! Songs, stories and gelt- OH MY!!!!

Prize for the most AWESOME Hanukkiah!

Sunday, December 5th at 4:00pm

Winner of the 2020 Jewish Collegiate KOLedge A Cappella Competition, The Alef Beats of Brown and RISD have been singing up and down the East Coast since our inception in 2005. The Beats sing in all styles and formats, including Israeli and American pop/rock, old country Yiddish melodies, showtunes, and arrangements of modern Hebrew liturgical songs. The Beats come from all over – our all-gender membership roster includes those from as far away as Malaysia, and as close to home as the Providence suburbs. Concentrations within the group vary as well, from Computer Science to Furniture Design. Through it all, the Beats are brought together by our goofy personalities, our love of music, and a healthy appreciation for Jewish values and tradition.

www.thealefbeats.wixsite.com/home