Shabbat Morning Services – October 2018

  • Shabbat October 6, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM—Shabbat Rishona                                               
  • 27 Tishrei 5779 Parashat Bereishit
  • Adult Study: Body Ethics—Jewish Views on Vegetarianism
  • Shabbat morning schedule
    • 9:00 AM – We begin gathering/setting up/getting ready
    • 9:15 AM – Children/students in the vestry for learning
    • 9:15 AM – Adults/teens in the sanctuary for prayer/worship/davening/Torah service (abbreviated)
    • 10:10 AM – Adults and children switch locations (vestry vs. sanctuary) so that that at 10:15 AM we change spaces so that  . . . .
    • 10:15 AM – Children/students in the sanctuary with Rabbi Heath for a kid-friendly Shabbat service. Parents only need to stay if their child can’t stay alone
    • 10:15 AM – Adults learning together in the vestry using handout/resource material on Body Ethics: Jewish Views on Vegetarianism.
    • 11:00 AM – Kiddush together in the vestry

Shabbat October 13, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM                                                               

  • 4 Cheshvan 5779   Parashat Noah
  • Adult Study: Praying with Our Feet—Clean Water
  • Shabbat morning schedule
    • 9:00 AM – We begin gathering for the morning
    • 9:15 AM – Adult learning
    • 10:00 AM – Prayer/worship/davening/Torah service
    • 11:10 AM – Kiddush together in the vestry

Shabbat October 20, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM — Book Discussion at 11:30 AM               

  • 11 Cheshvan 5779   Parashat Lekh Lekha
  • Adult Study: Heritage, Civilization and the Jews: The Power of the Word (500 BCE—200 CE) (view video in advance)
  • Shabbat morning schedule
    • 9:00 AM – We begin gathering for the morning
    • 9:15 AM – Adult learning
    • 10:00 AM – Prayer/worship/davening/Torah service
    • 11:10 AM – Kiddush together in the vestry
    • 11:30 AM—Book discussion after Kiddush—The Weight of Ink – Led by A.Kearnan

Shabbat October 27, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM—JArts Shabbat—Alef Beats – A Cappella from Brown/RISD Hillel

  • 18 Cheshvan 5779 Parashat Vayera
  • Shabbat morning schedule
    • 9:00 AM – We begin gathering for the morning
    • 9:15 AM – Prayer/worship/davening/Torah service
    • 10:45 AM – Alef Beats a Cappella group from Brown/RISD Hillel
    • 11:30 AM – Kiddush together in the vestry

 

Shabbat Morning Services – September 2018

Shabbat September 1, 2018———NO SERVICES

  • 21 Elul 5778  Parashat Ki Tavo
  • Deuteronomy 26:1-29:8  Isaiah 60:1-60:22
  • Candle Lighting—7:00 PM, Friday, August 31
  • Havdalah—8:07 PM, Saturday, Sept. 1

 Shabbat September 8, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM

  • 28 Elul 5778  Parashat Nitzavim
  • Deuteronomy 29:9-30:20   Isaiah 61:10-63:9
  • Candle Lighting—6:49 PM, Friday, September 7
  • Havdalah—7:55 PM, Saturday, September 8
  • Adult Study:  Introduction to This Year’s Shabbat Morning Adult Study

 Shabbat September 15, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM

  • 6 Tishri 5779   Parashat Vayeilech   Shabbat Shuvah
  • Deuteronomy 31:1-31:30   Hosea 14:2-10, Michah 7:18-20, Joel 2:15-27
  • Candle Lighting—6:36 PM, Friday, September 14
  • Havdalah—7:43 PM, Saturday, September 15
  • Adult Study:  Kabbalah of Forgiveness

 Shabbat September 22, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM

  • 13 Tishri 5779   Parashat Ha’azinu  
  • Deuteronomy 32:1-32:52   II Samuel 22:1-22:51
  • Candle Lighting—6:24 PM, Friday, September 21
  • Havdalah—7:30 PM, Saturday, September 22
  • Adult Study:  Heritage, Civilization and the Jews: A People is Born

 Shabbat September 29, 2018—Services @ 9:00 AM

  • 20 Tishri 5779   Shabbat Chol Ha Mo’eid Sukkot
  • Exodus 33:12-34:26, Numbers 29:6-31   Ezekiel 38:18-39:16
  • Candle Lighting—6:12 PM, Friday, September 28
  • Havdalah—7:18 PM, Saturday, September 29
  • Adult Study:  Body Ethics: Jewish Views on Abortion

OSEH SHALOM / May the One Who Creates Peace

More videos to share:

OSEH SHALOM / May the One Who Creates Peace

Enjoy these varied, new and classic renditions of Oseh Shalom  — May the One who creates harmony on high, bring peace to us and to all Israel (and to all who dwell on earth) – and, let us say “Amen”.

 

Adon Olam – Variations

Jewish Music Rocks kept us learning and enjoying music on Shabbat morning September 6th.  The first Shabbat of the month in October is Yom Kippur, so Jewish Music Rocks returns on the first Shabbat in November – November 1st..  Until then, here are more contemporary versions of Adon Olam for you to enjoy.  Check the previous post for the words in Hebrew, English and transliteration.

 

 

 

 

Surprise – A dance along with a new melody.  Quite a bit of contemporary Israeli music is choreographed for a more physical interpretation and experience of the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adon Olam (Pharrell Williams – “Happy”)

JEWISH MUSIC ROCKS – yes, it’s true, the meter of Adon Olam renders it possible to sing it to almost any melody – and most Hebrew school students have, at one time or another, if their teachers are letting them have that kind of fun!!

This  Shabbat morning we ended services with the Pharrell Williams melody for “Happy” which is omnipresent in our musical worlds these days, but changed the words to a classic Jewish poem – Adon Olam / Master of the Universe – sung by Listen Up! A Cappella.

 

 

Adon Olam (“Lord of the World”) is alleged to be composed in the 11th century by Solomon ibn Gabirol. The word “Adon,” meaning master, was first spoken by Abraham in the Bible, referring to God. The lyrics speak about God’s greatness and all-empowering existence. There have been countless melodies adjoined to this hymn.

Adon Olam is the final prayer of the Musaf service on Shabbat morning and festivals. It can also be found in the composition of bedtime prayers and is recited on one’s deathbed. In the next to last line of the Adon Olam is a request that God watch over one’s soul as they sleep. The conclusion of Adon Olam mentions God’s presence and ability to bring reassurance to the people.

ADON OLAM MASTER OF THE UNIVERSE

Adon olam, asher malach,
b’terem kol y’tzir nivra.
L’et na’asah v’cheftzo kol,
azai melech sh’mo nikra.

V’acharey kichlot hakol,
l’vado yimloch nora.
V’hu haya, v’hu hoveh,
v’hu yih’yeh b’tifara.

V’hu echad, v’eyn sheni
l’hamshil lo, l’hachbira.
B’li reishit, b’li tachlit,
v’lo ha’oz v’hamisrah.

V’hu Eli, v’chai go’ali,
v’tzur chevli b’et tzarah.
V’hu nisi umanos li,
m’nat kosi b’yom ekra.

B’yado afkid ruchi
b’et ishan v’a’irah.
V’im ruchi g’viyati,
Adonai li v’lo ira.

The Lord of the Universe who reigned
before anything was created.
When all was made by his will
He was acknowledged as King.

And when all shall end
He still all alone shall reign.
He was, He is,
and He shall be in glory.

And He is one, and there’s no other,
to compare or join Him.
Without beginning, without end
and to Him belong dominion and power.

And He is my G-d, my living G-d.
to Him I flee in time of grief,
and He is my miracle and my refuge,
who answers the day I shall call.

To Him I commit my spirit,
in the time of sleep and awakening,
even if my spirit leaves,
G-d is with me, I shall not fear.

אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם אֲשֶׁר מָלַךְ,
בְּטֶרֶם כָּל יְצִיר נִבְרָא.
לְעֵת נַעֲשָׂה בְחֶפְצוֹ כֹּל,
אֲזַי מֶלֶךְ שְׁמוֹ נִקְרָא.

וְאַחֲרֵי כִּכְלוֹת הַכֹּל,
לְבַדּוֹ יִמְלוֹךְ נוֹרָא.
וְהוּא הָיָה, וְהוּא הֹוֶה,
וְהוּא יִהְיֶה, בְּתִפְאָרָה.

וְהוּא אֶחָד וְאֵין שֵׁנִי,
לְהַמְשִׁיל לוֹ לְהַחְבִּירָה.
בְּלִי רֵאשִׁית בְּלִי תַכְלִית,
וְלוֹ הָעֹז וְהַמִּשְׂרָה.

וְהוּא אֵלִי וְחַי גֹּאֲלִי,
וְצוּר חֶבְלִי בְּעֵת צָרָה.
וְהוּא נִסִּי וּמָנוֹס לִי,
מְנָת כּוֹסִי בְּיוֹם אֶקְרָא.

בְּיָדוֹ אַפְקִיד רוּחִי,
בְּעֵת אִישַׁן וְאָעִירָה.
וְעִם רוּחִי גְּוִיָּתִי,
יְיָ לִי וְלֹא אִירָא.

This and much more information about all things Jewish  is available from the Jewish Virtual Library.

Sources: Eisenberg, Ronald L. The JPS Guide to Jewish Traditions. PA: Jewish Publication Society, 2004; “What is in the Siddur? Shabbat and Holiday Liturgy”; “Adon Olam”; Wigoder, Geoffrey , Ed. The New Standard Jewish Encyclopedia. NY: Facts on File, 1992; “Song: Adon Olam”.

Let There Be Peace – יהי שלום

JEWISH MUSIC ROCKS – we continued this Shabbat morning with a very recent (August 2014) song praying for a better world – for peace.  The video is followed by YouTube notes upon the songs release.

Published on Aug 14, 2014

Y’hi shalom becheilech shalvah be’arm’notaich.
Let there be peace in your borders, tranquility in your castles…

Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson release a powerful music video offering a heartfelt prayer for peace against searing images from Israel and Gaza. In the midst of a summer of bloodshed and strife, the duo performs Shlomo Carlebach’s iconic song…

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Shira Dicker
917.403.3989
shira.dicker@sd-media.com

August 15, 2014 (New York, NY) — Let there be peace on earth; let it begin in me… for love is all we need.

Moved by a summer of pain and suffering in the Middle East, at home and around the world, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson have responded in the form of a prayerful, riveting and emotionally raw music video, produced by Josh Nelson.

Musical artists with a lifelong commitment to Israel, trans-denominational appeal and a message of unity for the Jewish community and the world at large, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson were compelled to record the legendary melody composed by the late, great Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach in the midst of the violence in Israel and Gaza…and in the face of the resurgence of anti-Semitism around the world.

“As a Jew, as a mother and as a human being, I am terrified by the escalating hatred that I see in this world,” stated Neshama Carlebach, daughter of Shlomo Carlebach. “I grew up knowing that my father’s family ran from Nazi-occupied Europe and was aware of my deep blessing; that I was living securely and free of fear. I hear his voice in my head. This song is our prayer.”

Individually and as a creative team, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson perform widely across the denominational spectrum of Jewish life and in secular venues as well. Deeply invested in Jewish Peoplehood, they are spiritual role models in their community. As such, they felt the urgent need to call for peace and love in the middle of this time of unprecedented conflict, they said. “We believe that all people have the right to live their lives without fear, and when we decided to speak up, we knew of no text more poignant than this prayer for peace,” said Josh Nelson.

Shlomo Carlebach’s version of “Y’hi Shalom” is beloved and meaningful for millions around the world, Jews and non-Jews alike, explained Josh Nelson. “We hope that this recording will inspire humanity to come together and to begin to move in a new direction. There are no simple answers to the incredibly complex situation in Israel and Gaza, but the message in this song may be a place to start.”

View the video here: http://youtu.be/5zQK6-Z6gQw.

For more information on Neshama Carlebach, Josh Nelson or the making of “Y’hi Shalom,” please contact Shira Dicker at shira.dicker@sd-media.com or 917.403.3989 or visit http://www.neshamacarlebach.com and http://www.joshnelsonproject.com.